Title: Pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure. A national study of employment impacts.
Authors: Garrett-Peltier, Heidi
Editor(s): University of Massachusetts, Political Economy Research Institute, Amherst
Document Type: Graue Literatur
Add. Document Type: Elektronisches Dokument
Language: englisch
Language of Summary: englisch
Publisher Country: USA
Publisher Location: Amherst
Issue Date: 2011
Page(s): 14 S.
Features: Tab.
Abstract: The study analyses the impacts of the design and construction of walking and cycling infrastructure. On the basis of data collected from transportation and public work departments of 11 cities in the United States, a detailed input-output model is used to show the direct and indirect effects of infrastructure projects on job creation. The result shows, that for every $1Million spend in cycling projects 11.4 jobs have been created in the area where the project is situated. Projects combining pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure projects created slightly fewer job opportunities. Through spill-over effects 3 additional jobs have been created indirectly in other states for every $1 Million invested.
Deskriptors: Individualverkehr
Fahrradverkehr
Fahrradweg
Verkehrsinfrastruktur
Arbeitsplatz
Fußgänger
Wirkungsanalyse
Covered Region(s): USA; Anchorage; Baltimore; Bloomington; Eugene; Houston; Austin; Lexington; Madison; Santa Cruz; Seattle; Concord; Kalifornien; Washintong/DC
URL: http://www.peri.umass.edu/fileadmin/pdf/published_study/PERI_ABikes_June2011.pdf
metadata.dc.rights.license: Deposit Licence - Keine Weiterverbreitung, keine Bearbeitung
Appears in Collections:Radverkehr

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